Cooking at Castle Ronneburg

It was a dream come true when friends from German re-enactment group MiM (IG Mensch im Mittelalter) invited me and my friends from Merry Swan tailor group to spend a weekend at Castle Ronneburg, Germany last weekend at 100 Jahre 14tes Jahrhundert event. I was accepted to work in the castle kitchen with awesome re-enactors from around Europe. Together with Mervi and other Swans we made food and helped others to make their dishes for about 80 people. Swans used some of the recipes that are in our cooking book and in this blog and some recipes our members have got to known by their travels to the other events. Mervi’s meat pies were a success and I am intending to writing down some more pie recipes here in future.

Did I mention awesome people? The kitchen grew was mainly from Germany, Netherlands, England, Luxembourg and Finland. There I met nice people from a group called Apri Ludibundi –historic kitchen group. You can find a lot more pictures about the event from their facebook page here.

Here are some of my pictures and some of our Swan group pictures (Antti was behind the camera) from past weekend:

A boy waiting for the breakfast

A boy waiting for the breakfast

kitchen

Smoky kitchen

Chopping

Chopping

Smoky wall

Smoky wall

High Chef Ronnie cooking

High Chef Ronnie (from MiM) cooking

Riku keeping fire going on

Riku keeping fire going on

Making krumme krapfen - fried horse shoes

Making krumme krapfen – fried horse shoes

Mervi, Chrissi and Me cooking for lunch

Mervi, Chrissi (from Walshingham Pilgrims)  and me cooking lunch

Markus from Apri Ludibundi group making four with his mill

Markus from Apri Ludibundi group making flour with his mill

Pie factory

Pie factory

Pie factory

Pie factory

Delicious meat pies

Delicious meat pies

Me happy

Me happy

New books and plans

I have been reading my books and making plans for the future cooking. I have so many ideas I end up making an exel sheet. That helps a lot to decide what I want to do next and what I have done so far. But I have also been thinking of a lot about my attitudes towards cooking and learning. Its good for stop now and then to do some self examination.

I have noticed (actually years ago) that more I read and more I learn – more I know how little I know. You know the usual feeling. That little perfectionist grows inside me every day and writing that used to be so casual – is not that anymore. When I find a nice and easy recipe to cook I end up looking similar recipes from all other my books to compare them. That usually takes a lot of time but it is a good learning experience at the same time. I know that in order to learn you need also make mistakes. Even the best cook makes mistakes. I am no way near best, and I dont have to be. I want to learn. But still that little perfectionist inside makes it hard to start from somewhere. And I tend to over think a bit too much.

Anyway.. new books :)

books

The book on the top I got from my dear friend who visited Italy. She found the book from an old antiquarian and thought I would like it. She was right, I was pretty exited to have it. I dont speak Italian but I like challenges so now I guess I have to learn some ;). The other two are Constance B. Hieatt’s books that are nice addition to my English book collection.

Congordes – Squash soup

There are all together four different extant Le Viandier manuscripts, which are one of the most famous medieval French cookery manuscripts from (dated around) 14th century. Fifth version was destroyed during the 2nd World War. All of the manuscript has variations and they are not identical. All in all there are 15 printed editions of them. Some of the editions clearly have recipes that probably are not even originally connected to Le Viandier but nevertheless they are dated from 1490 to 1604. This recipe comes from a 15th century printed edition.

CONGORDES

Pour congordes, pelés les et deccopés par rouelles, et ostés la graine dedens, s’il en y a, et les mettés pourboulir en une paelle, et puis les purés, et mettés de l’eaue froide par dessus, et les espregnés et hachés bien menu; et puis les assemblés avec boullon de beuf ou d’autre cher, et y mettés du lait de vache, et destrampés demy douzaine de moyeux d’oeufz, passés par l’estamine parmy le boullon avec le lait, et, au jours maigrez, de purée de poys ou de lait d’amandes, et du beurre.
squash soup
1,5 kg butternut squash (or pumpkin*) or about 1 liter of squash puree
1 dl strong meat broth
2 dl cream
2 egg yolks

Peel the squash and remove seeds. Cut the squash into small cubes. Boil the cubes soft in water and then puree the squash. Make sure that the puree is not too wet. Add meat broth and cream and boil briefly. Carefully mix together the egg yolks and little bit of hot soup in a separate bowl. Add egg mixture to the soup and mix well. Boil briefly and add salt if needed.

*Use squash or gourd if you can. You can use pumpkin (Cucurbita) too, but remember that most of the species are from New World. Lagenaria- family gourds have been cultivated in Europe during Middle Ages but these days it is really hard to find them from normal grocery shops at least here at Finland.

********************************************************************************************

CONGORDES

1,5 kg myskikurpitsaa tai muuta saatavilla olevaa kurpitsaa* tai n. litra kurpitsasosetta
1 dl vahvaa lihalientä
2 dl kermaa
2 kananmunan keltuaista

Kuori ja poista siemenet kurpitsasta ja leikkaa kurpitsa pieniksi paloiksi. Kiehauta kurpitsan palat vedessä kypsäksi. Tarkkaile, ettei soseesta tule liian löysää. Lisää lihaliemi ja kerma ja kiehauta. Ota hieman keittoa erilliseen kulhoon ja sekoita sen joukkoon kananmunan keltuaiset. Lisää seos kuumaan kiehuvaan keittoon hyvin sekoittaen. Kiehauta ja lisää tarvittaessa suolaa.

*Suomessa ruokakaupassa myytävät kurpitsat ovat tavallisesti uuden maailman tuotteita, eli juuri näitä lajeja ei kasvanut keskiajalla Euroopassa. Niitä voi kuitenkin hyvin käyttää korvaavana raaka-aineena, ellei muuta ole saatavilla.

Le viandier pour appareiller toutes manières de viandes / 15th century Viandier, c. 1485/90
(Pichon/Vicaire: ‘Le Viandier de Taillevent, Édition du XVe siècle’). Digital edition by Thomas Gloning.
https://www.staff.uni-giessen.de/gloning/tx/viand15.htm

Cherry Torte

Summer has been busy as always. We once again we were making daily meals at Cudgel Wars in July. This time I had time to take couple of photos and I posted to “Let hem boyle’s” Facebook page. As soon as I have time I will write down the recipes and post them here. My dear friend Sahra became a member of the Order of the Laurel at Cudgel Wars. Last weekend I re-made a cherry torte I did for her vigil at the event.

How to make a red cherry and rose torte

Take the blackest cherries you can find, and after you have removed the pits, grind well in a mortar, and take some red roses that have been finely chopped with a knife, with a little fresh cheese and a bit of good aged cheese, adding some spices, that is, cinnamon, ginger, and a little pepper and some sugar. And mix all these things together very well, adding also three or four eggs as needed. And cook slowly in a pan with a crust on the bottom. As soon as it is done, top with some sugar and some rosewater.

cherry

The dough

3-4 dl flour
100 g butter
4 tablespoon of water
4 tablespoon of sugar

The filling

About 500 g cherries (3 dl chopped cherries)
(Couple edible rose petals chopped- or rosewater)
2 tablespoon of rosewater
200 g fresh cheese
1 tablespoon of grated parmesan cheese (-optional)
3 eggs
1/2 dl sugar
1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon of ginger
A dash of ground black pepper

Sugar and rosewater for finishing touch

Mix together the dough ingredients and put the dough to the fridge to rest until the filling is done.
Remove the stones and the stems from the cherries. Chop the cherries finely or grind them in a mortar. Mix together well all filling ingredients. Use chopped fresh edible red rose petals or rosewater. Bake in an oven in 225 Celsius about 20-30 minutes until the filling has set and the crust is golden brown. Sprinkle the torte with a little bit of rosewater and sugar if you wish before serving.

(The Art of Cooking, The First Modern Cookery Book, The Eminent Maestro Martino of Como, 15th century, Ballerini)

***********************************************************************

Kesä on ollut täynnä kiirettä kuten aikaisempinakin vuosina. Nuijasodassa ehdin jopa kokkauksen lomassa ottamaan pari valokuvaa ruuista.. reseptejä seuraa heti kun ehdin kirjoittamaan ne puhtaaksi. Tässä on kuitenkin nyt kovasti kysytyn kirsikkapiiraan ohje. Tein piirakkaa hyvän ystäväni Sahran vigiliaan (hänestä tuli laakeriseppeleen ritarikunnan jäsen) Nuijasodassa viime kuussa.

Kirsikkapiiras

Taikina

3-4 dl vehnäjauhoja
100 g voita
4 rkl vettä
4 rkl sokeria

Täyte

Noin 500 g kirsikoita (3 dl kirsikoita hienonnettuna)
(Muutama syötävä ruusun terälehti hienonnettuna tai ruusuvettä)
2 rkl ruusuvettä
200 g maustamatonta tuorejuustoa
1 rkl parmesan juustoraastetta (ei välttämätön)
3 kananmunaa
1/2 dl sokeria
1/2 tl kanelia
1/2 tl inkivääriä
Hyppysellinen jauhettua mustapippuria

Sokeria ja ruusuvettä viimeistelyyn

Sekoita taikinan ainekset keskenään ja laita taikina jääkaappiin vetäytymään siksi aikaa kun teet täytteen.
Poista kirsikoista kivet ja varret ja hienonna ne joko veitsellä pieneksi tai morttelissa. Sekoita keskenään täytteen ainekset hyvin. Käytä tuoreita syötäviä ruusun terälehtiä, jos niitä on saatavilla. Muuten voit korvata terälehdet ruusuvedellä. Paista 225 asteessa noin 20-30 minuuttia kunnes täyte on hyytynyt ja piirakan reunat ovat kullan ruskeat. Voit halutessasi pirskotella valmiin piiraan päälle hieman ruusuvettä ja sokeria ennen tarjoilua.

(The Art of Cooking, The First Modern Cookery Book, The Eminent Maestro Martino of Como, 15th century, Ballerini)

Season’s greetings and voting for the best Finnish history blog of all times

www.yle.fi

kuva: yle.fi

It is time to wish all the readers happy holidays! I wish you all relaxing time and all the best for the year 2014. Although I have not been very active this year I have had lots of readers and I want to thank you all for reading, I will continue on writing next year maybe even more than this year (I hope).

Yesterday I learned that Let hem boyle has been nominated by Finnish Broadcasting Company Yle for best Finnish history blog of all times. The voting is on and everybody can go and vote from here. There are 20 blogs and some of them are my friend’s blogs. I am surprised my blog is there and highly honored.

****************************************************

On aika toivottaa mukavaa lomaa kaikille lukijoille! Toivon teille rauhallista joulunaikaa ja kaikkea hyvää vuodelle 2014. Vaikka en olekaan kovin aktiivisesti kirjoittanut tänä vuonna, on lukijoita silti riittänyt runsaasti. Kiitos kaikille lukijoille! Yritän petrata taas ensi vuonna ja kirjoittaa useammin.

Eilen sain tietää, että Let hem boyle on ehdolla Ylen äänestyksessä kaikkien aikojen historiablogiksi. Äänestys on käynnissä ja äänestää voi 13.1.2014 saakka. Äänen voi käydä antamassa täällä. Listalla on 20 historiablogia, joista osaa kirjoittavat hyvät ystäväni. Olen otettu ja yllättynyt tästä kunniasta.

Another note

Life in generally and hobbies have still kept me busy lately (events, medieval markets, seneschal stuff in SCA, lectures). But maybe it will calm a bit in near future so I get more time for blogging.

Two weeks ago at Aarnimetsä Baronial Investiture -event (SCA) I got surprised a big time. I was elevated to the Order of the Laurel for my cooking. For those who does not know what that mean, it is the highest award from arts and sciences you can receive in our society. It is still very hard to describe the feelings and happiness even when it has already been days. But lets just say the whole weekend was just amazing and magical. My dear friend Mistress Katheryn has written about it in her blog.

Eva

Photo by Mistress Lia de Thornegge

 

 

Quick note

We have been working on translating our book into English and the translation work is almost done. I have also stated to plan daily meals for our 9 day long camping event Cudgel War which will be held at July. These two things among some other stuff is taking all my free time currently. It is possible that I am still not able to post recipes in couple weeks or so. But hang on tight, more is coming as soon as possible :). And I found myself thinking of what to cook next at grocery yesterday.. soon it will be a perfect time to cook from Summer fruits and vegetables.

What’s your favourite summer medieval dish?

***********************

Pikaiset terveiset

Kiirettä on pitänyt keittokirjan käännöstyön kanssa, mutta kohta englanninkielinen versio Sahramia munia ja mantelimaitoa –kirjasta on valmis. Lisäksi olen aloitellut suunnittelemaan tämän kesän Nuijasota-tapahtuman päiväruokia. Tapahtuma järjestetään heinäkuussa. Nämä kaksi sekä muutama muu kiireellinen työ vie tällä hetkellä kaiken vapaa-ajan. On siis mahdollista, että en ehdi vielä myöskään seuraavaan muutamaan viikkoon kirjoittelemaan tänne uusia reseptejä. Mutta odottakaahan, kyllä niitä taas tulee lisää jahka kiireet hellittää :). Eilen löysin itseni kaupan vihannesosastolta miettimässä mitä seuraavaksi voisi kokata. Pian on täydellinen aika kokata kesän hedelmistä ja vihanneksista.

Mikä on sinun mielestäsi paras keskiaikainen kesäruoka?

Two Furmenty recipes

I have done lots of cooking lately. I got sidetracked from my goal to re-make and write the recipes for the dishes (from Forme of Cury) that we made at Midwinter Feast.  Last weekend a friend came over and he brought some nice reindeer meat with him. I have always wanted to make Furmenty with Venison from Take a thousand eggs or more –2nd book (Harleian MS. 4016, c. 1450). So I ended up testing two recipes that goes well with the reindeer. The Furmenty version is posted here now along with the Forme of Cury’s (from MS. Douce 257, Ancient Cookery c. 1381 part by S.Pegge) furmenty recipe that we made at Midwinter Feast. The other reindeer recipe from last weekend and “how to cook venison” I will post later.

So this post is all about that thick wheat porridge, which is very familiar for all who have read medieval recipes. It is very commonly served with venison in meat days. There are lots of different versions of the furmenty (or frumenty, frumentee…) in sources from different countries and time frame.

Thoughts about the two different recipes

There are some similarities definitely in these recipes, but lots of differences. The 14th century recipe suggests that you can use almond milk instead of “swete mylk, sweet milk” and that is a good choice if you are making the furmenty with fish and as a Lenten dish (Forme of Cury has a Lenten version of furmenty with porpoise – at that time thought to be a fish). The recipe also suggests that you should use broth, (probably meat broth if non Lenten time) but the other recipe does not call for broth, just “fair water”. The 15th century dish says that sugar and saffron is added to the dish.  So the dish should be sweet and sour and colored with saffron. The 14th century recipe does not advice to add sugar or saffron (although I did use saffron because I wanted to have more color to the dish). Both dishes say that furmenty is served with venison. The 14th century recipe also says it can be served with mutton.

Furmenty with Venison

Take fair wheat and bray it in a mortar. And fan away clean the dust, and wash it in fair water and let it boil till it breaks. Then take away the water clean, and cast thereto sweet milk, and set it over the fire. Let it boil till it is thick enough. And cast thereto a good quantity of separated raw yolks of eggs, and cast thereto saffron, sugar and salt; but let it boil no more then, but set it on few coals, lest the liquor wax cold. And then take fresh venison, and water it. Seethe it and cut it in thin slices. And if it is salted, water it, seethe it and cut it as it shall be served forth, and put it (in a vessel) with fair water, and boil it again. And as it boils, blow away the grease, and serve it forth with furmenty, and a little broth in the dish all hot with the flesh.

rdeerfurm-6539

Serves 4

3 dl spelt

5 dl water

2 dl cream

2 egg yolks

pinch of saffron

1 tablespoon of brown sugar

1 teaspoon of salt (or salt to the taste)

Cook the spelt in water until the water has absorbed. Add cream and saffron and simmer in a low heat until the cream has absorbed to the spelt. Add more water if needed. When the furmenty looks like a porridge and is done, add yolks, salt and sugar. Stir couple of minutes. Serve hot with boiled deer or reindeer meat (one recipe suggestion later).

Comments: Sugar makes a nice twist in this dish! Do not be afraid to use it.

(Take a thousand eggs or more, II Volume, Harleian MS. 4016, c. 1450)

For to make Furmenty

Nym clene wete and bray it in a morter wel that the holys gon al of and seyt yt til it breste and nym yt up. And lat it kele and nym fayre fresch broth and swete mylk of Almandys or swete mylk of kyne and temper yt al. And nym the yolkys of eyryn. Boyle it a lityl and set yt adoun and messe yt forthe wyth fat venison and fresh moton.

furmenty

Serves 4

3 dl spelt

5 dl meat broth

2 dl cream

2 egg yolks

(saffron, salt)

Cook the spelt in meat broth until the water has absorbed. Add cream (and a pinch of saffron if you want) and simmer in a low heat until the cream has absorbed to the spelt. Add more water if needed. When the furmenty looks like a porridge and is done, add yolks. Stir couple of minutes. Add salt if needed. Serve hot with boiled deer or reindeer meat or with cooked mutton.

Comments: Saffron is not mentioned in the original text. Other furmenty recipes sometimes call for saffron. You can leave it away if you wish.

(Forme of Cury, Ancient Cookery, c. 1381)

***************************************************

Jouduin sivuraiteille viime viikonloppuna, tarkoituksena kun oli tehdä ruokia Sydäntalven juhlien pidoilta blogia varten ja keskittyä Forme of Curyyn. Kaveri tuli käymään meillä ja toi mukanaan poron paistia. Olen aina halunnut tehdä Take a thousand eggs of moren II-kirjasta perinteistä keskiaikaista vehnäpuuroa riistalihan kera (Furmenty with Venison, Harleian MS. 4016, ajoitettu n. 1450). Niinpä päädyin tekemään kaksi pororuokaa viime viikonloppuna. Furmenty (vehnäpuuro) versio poron kera on tässä alla sekä Furmenty, Forme of Curystä (peräisin MS. Douce 257 (Ancient Cookery) käsikirjoituksesta, joka on osa S. Peggen Forme of Cury reseptikokoelmaa), jota teimme myös Sydäntalven juhlassa. Aika sekavasti selitetty, mutta toivottavasti saatte jutun juonesta kiinni… Joka tapauksessa sen toisen viime viikonloppuisen pororeseptin ja “kuinka keittää poron paistia”- reseptin laitan tänne myöhemmin.

Eli siis.. tämä blogipostaus koskee pelkästään tuota keskiajalla tunnettua vehnäpuuroa. Tätä kyseistä puuroa on kutsuttu monella nimellä, riippuen lähteestä (furmenty, frumenty, frumentee..). Se on tuttu monelle, jotka ovat tutustuneet keskiaikaisiin ruokaresepteihin. Furmenty tarjoillaan usein riistalihan kera, yleensä peuran lihan kera (muutkin vaihtoehdot käyvät, koska sana ”venison” voi tarkoittaa hirveä tai kaurista tms.).

Ajatuksia kahden alla olevan reseptin eroista ja yhtäläisyyksistä

Näissä kahdessa alla olevassa reseptissä on paljon yhtäläisyyksiä, mutta toisaalta myös paljon eroja. 1300-luvun reseptissä neuvotaan käyttämään halutessa mantelimaitoa ”makean maidon” (tässä tapauksessa käytin kermaa) sijasta, mikä onkin hyvä vaihtoehto, jos ruuan tarjoilee kalan kera tai paastonajan ruokana. Forme of Curyssä on paastonajan versio tälle ruokalajille, joka on tehty mantelimaitoon. Paaston ajan furmenty neuvotaan tarjoilemaan hauskasti (?) delfiinin kera, jota tuohon aikaan pidettiin kalana. 1300-luvun resepti kehottaa käyttämään vehnän keittämiseen hyvää lientä (mahdollisesti lihalientä, jos kyseessä ei ole paastopäivä). 1400-luvun resepti taas ei neuvo käyttämään lientä vaan puhdasta vettä (jälleen hauska yksityiskohta, jota voisi pohtia enemmänkin). 1400-luvun resepti kertoo, että ruokaan tulee myös sokeria ja sahramia. Eli ruuan tulee olla suolaisen makea ja väriltään sahramin kultaista. 1300-luvun resepti ei neuvo lisäämän sokeria tai sahramia (tosin laitoin omaan versiooni sahramia, lähinnä värin vuoksi). Molemmat reseptit neuvovat tarjoamaan ruuan peuranlihan (tai vastaavan) kera. 1300-luvun resepti kertoo, että lampaan liha käy myös.

Furmenty with Venison – vehnäpuuroa riistalihan kera

Take fair wheat and bray it in a mortar. And fan away clean the dust, and wash it in fair water and let it boil till it breaks. Then take away the water clean, and cast thereto sweet milk, and set it over the fire. Let it boil till it is thick enough. And cast thereto a good quantity of separated raw yolks of eggs, and cast thereto saffron, sugar and salt; but let it boil no more then, but set it on few coals, lest the liquor wax cold. And then take fresh venison, and water it. Seethe it and cut it in thin slices. And if it is salted, water it, seethe it and cut it as it shall be served forth, and put it (in a vessel) with fair water, and boil it again. And as it boils, blow away the grease, and serve it forth with furmenty, and a little broth in the dish all hot with the flesh.

4 hengelle

3 dl spelttihelmiä

5 dl vettä

2 dl kermaa

2 kananmunan keltuaista

hyppysellinen sahramia

1 ruokalusikallinen ruskeaa sokeria

1 teelusikallinen suolaa tai suolaa maun mukaan

Keitä spelttihelmiä vedesssä, kunnes vesi on imeytynyt spelttiin. Lisää kerma ja sahrami. Hauduta miedolla lämmöllä, kunnes kerma on imeytynyt spelttiin. Lisää vettä tarvittaessa. Kun speltti on puuroutunut ja kypsää, lisää munankeltuaiset, suola ja sokeri ja sekoittele muutama minuutti. Tarjoa kuumana keitetyn riistalihan kera (reseptiehdotelma siitä, miten keitetään poroa, tulee tänne myöhemmin).

Kommentit: Sokeri tekee mukavan säväyksen tähän ruokaan! Älä pelkää käyttää sitä.

(Take a thousand eggs or more, II Volume, Harleian MS. 4016, n. 1450)

For to make Furmenty – vehnäpuuro

Nym clene wete and bray it in a morter wel that the holys gon al of and seyt yt til it breste and nym yt up. And lat it kele and nym fayre fresch broth and swete mylk of Almandys or swete mylk of kyne and temper yt al. And nym the yolkys of eyryn. Boyle it a lityl and set yt adoun and messe yt forthe wyth fat venison and fresh moton.

4 hengelle

3 dl spelttihelmiä

5 dl lihalientä

2 dl kermaa

2 kananmunan keltuaisia

(sahramia, suolaa)

Keitä spelttihelmiä hyvässä lihaliemessä, kunnes neste on imeytynyt spelttiin. Lisää kerma (ja sahrami, niin halutessasi). Hauduta miedolla lämmöllä, kunnes kerma on imeytynyt spelttiin. Lisää vettä tarvittaessa. Kun speltti on puuroutunut ja kypsää, lisää munankeltuaiset ja sekoittele muutama minuutti. Lisää suolaa tarvittaessa. Tarjoa kuumana keitetyn riistalihan tai lampaan kera

Kommentit: Sahramia ei mainita alkuperäisessä reseptissä. Muutamissa muissa keskiaikaisissa furmenty resepteissä sahrami on tosin mainittu. Voit jättää sahramin pois, jos haluat.

(Forme of Cury, Ancient Cookery, n. 1381)

Lumbard Mustard

I have to say that I love mustard! All different kinds of… it can be strong, mild, vinegary, spiced.. I do like them all. Making mustard for an event has been a plan for long time, but I haven’t done it until Midwinter Feast. This recipe is great! You can make it beforehand and store it in fridge. It will be good stored in fridge for couple of weeks.

Lumbard Mustard

Take mustard seeds and waishe it and drye it in an ovene, grynde it drye. Farse it thurgh a farse. Clarifie hony with wyne and vynegur and stere it wel togedrer and make it thikke ynowz. And whan thou wilt spende thereof make it tnynne with wyne.

mustard-6425

130 g mustard seeds

2 dl white wine

2 tablespoon of vinegar

1 egg

1 dl honey

Roast the mustard seeds in an oven in 120 ⁰C about 10 minutes or less. Whisk an egg. Grind the seeds and pour them in to a pot. Add the wine and honey. Slowly bring it to boil. Add an egg to the simmering mustard whisking all the time. Take the mustard out of the heat and add the vinegar. Pour the mustard into clean glass jar and when cooled store in a fridge. Serve hot or cold. If you want to make the mustard thinner, add more wine just before serving.

Comments: The recipe doesn’t say exactly how to make the mustard thick. You can boil it as long as it is thick enough or add an egg as I have in my redaction.  Remember not to roast the seeds too much. A little time in a low heat will make the seeds taste lovely. If burned then the whole mustard taste bad.

(Forme of Cury, 1390)

*********************************

Olen jo pitkään haaveillut oman sinapin tekemisestä tapahtumaan. Nyt vihdoin Sydäntalven juhlaan tein sinappia alla olevalla ohjeella. Tämä ohje on siitä hyvä, että sen voi tehdä etukäteen jääkaappiin ja se säilyy hyvänä muutamia viikkoja.

Lumbard Mustard

Take mustard seeds and waishe it and drye it in an ovene, grynde it drye. Farse it thurgh a farse. Clarifie hony with wyne and vynegur and stere it wel togedrer and make it thikke ynowz. And whan thou wilt spende thereof make it tnynne with wyne.

130 g sinapin siemeniä

2 dl valkoviiniä

2 ruokalusikallista viinietikkaa

1 kananmuna

1 dl hunajaa

Paahda sinapinsiemenet uunissa 120 ⁰C noin 10 minuuttia. Vatkaa muna. Jauha siemenet ja laita ne kattilaan. Lisää sinapinsiementen joukkoon valkoviini ja hunaja. Kuumenna kiehuvaksi. Lisää hyvin sekoittaen vatkattu kananmuna. Ota pois liedeltä ja lisää viinietikka. Kaada puhtaaseen lasiastiaan ja jäähdytä ja säilö jääkaapissa. Voit tarjota sinapin kuumana tai kylmänä. Jos haluat siitä juoksevampaa, lisää ennen tarjoilua hieman valkoviiniä.

Kommentit: Alkuperäinen resepti ei kerro tarkalleen miten sinapista tehdään paksua. Kananmunaa ei mainita reseptissä, joten voit jättää sen pois ja keittää sinappia kunnes se on riittävän sakeaa tai lisätä kananmunan kuten olen tehnyt yllä. Älä paahda siemeniä liian kauaa, koska ne palavat helposti. Palaneen siemenen maku pilaa helposti koko sinapin maun.

(Forme of Cury, 1390)